POKWASPA, The Blog: A place to examine in depth what really matters to us most

POKWASPA: The Blog is for all peanut allergy news on the radar: Things which infuriate, inspire, excite, terrify or upset us about peanut allergies. Our blog's mission is similar to our Facebook group, but here it's posted in a longer form so we can have the news we discuss available to refer to.

From the highly scientific to the deeply personal. From breakthroughs to personal setbacks. From tears to triumphs: Parents Of Kids With A Severe Peanut Allergy, The Blog seeks to engage, inform and empower parents to be the best they can be to their peanut allergic child by staying on top of what the buzz is right now regarding peanut allergies.

To submit posts for this blog email at parents.peanutallergy@gmail.com


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Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Full Podcast of npr's Diane Rehm Show "New Research On Preventing Peanut Allergies"

Click here to listen to Diane Rehm's show












-- from the WAMU 88.5 npr website
   For reasons not entirely clear, the number of people allergic to peanuts has risen dramatically in recent years. Peanut allergies usually appear in childhood. The condition is sometimes fatal, and there is no cure. For children with risk factors for allergies, pediatricians have long advised complete avoidance of peanuts. But a new study by British doctors — just published in The New England Journal of Medicine — suggests that advice was wrong. The study shows that exposing infants to peanuts could sharply cut the incidence of allergies to the legume. Many pediatricians are optimistic but not ready to issue new guidelines. We discuss the latest research.

Guests

  • Dr. Sally Joo Bailey assistant professor of pediatrics at Georgetown University School of Medicine.
  • Dr. Gideon Lack professor, King’s College London, and co-investigator of the peanut allergy study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
  • Dr. Hemant Sharma acting chief of the Division of Allergy and Immunology, and director of the Food Allergy Program, Children's National Health System.

Great examination on newest findings about the peanut allergies from the 2015 LEAP study

Article courtesy from very useful allergy/asthma website, AllergiesAsthmaChildren.com.  


Breaking Down the Landmark LEAP Study: What Does it Mean?

By David Stukus, MD
Electric. That was the mood when Dr. Gideon Lack presented the LEAP findings to the audience at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. It was an honor to be there, and some day I may be telling allergists who haven’t even been born that I was there, like a classic 7th game of a World Series or the recent Super Bowl. By now, almost everyone concerned with the peanut allergy epidemic knows: Dr. Lack and his colleagues George du Toit et al have completed a study showing that they may have found a way to wind down the epidemic a bit. The study has seized the imaginations of health care reporters all over the world. But before we declare victory, let’s take stock of what we know and what we don’t.
Bamba: The snack that started it
Bamba: The snack that started it
The numbers tell a familiar story: Food allergy in children has doubled in the past 10 years, and peanut allergy has nearly quadrupled since 1997. For the roughly 2% of children in the United States currently living with peanut allergy, managing their allergies demands significant lifestyle modification and constant preparation for accidents. Needless to say, quality of life often suffers for parents and children.
Most recent research has focused on treatment, but these results have not been definitive or quite as promising as we had hoped. Causation is another matter. The big picture is too big—the way we eat, the way we drive, the way we grow our food, and the way we treat illness. But what if we can prevent peanut allergies from occurring in the first place? What if we can do something if not for the current generation of food allergic kids, then at least for the next generation? That’s exactly what the researchers involved in the Learning About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) study sought to find out.
As the dimensions of the food allergy epidemic really started to take off, the conventional wisdom for how to prevent these allergies has shifted repeatedly. In 2000, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommended that parents refrain from feeding peanuts to infants at high risk for atopic disease until 3 years of age. However, peanut allergy continued to rise, which sent many physicians to reconsider. Careful review of the literature revealed very little, if any, evidence to support the guidelines. In 2008, the AAP published new guidelines in 2008, which in medical terms is overnight, retracting their previous stance, and declaring there was insufficient evidence to avoid peanut and other foods until a certain age, confusing pediatricians and parents alike.
In the midst of these changes, George du Toit, lead author of the LEAP study, identified a dramatic difference in peanut allergy between Israeli children and a similar population of kids in London. What was the difference? Israeli children almost universally consumed a snack called Bamba, prepared with peanuts, during infancy. The British researchers shifted their strategy from avoidance to early introduction. This was all speculation until the LEAP study results were released on February 23, 2015.
Before I dissect the LEAP study, there are a few extremely important things to understand about these findings:
  • This was not a study looking at treatment of children with peanut allergy. It does not offer insight into a cure and is not applicable to anyone who has had prior allergic reactions to peanut.
  • This should NOT be done at home! Every single child enrolled in this study underwent skin prick testing AND physician supervised oral challenge to peanut. Don’t experiment on your infant!
  • The children enrolled in this study were all less than 12 months old, living in the United Kingdom, predominantly white, had severe eczema and/or egg allergy. This must be considered before extrapolating results to other populations, i.e. older children or African American infants in the U.S. with multiple food allergies.
  • This study looked at very specific infants with severe eczema and/or egg allergy. There are other risk factors to consider (namely presence of other food allergies such as milk, wheat, soy and/or history of wheezing) that may have variable effects on this protocol.
  • The cut off point chosen as upper limit for inclusion by skin prick test size was a 4 mm wheal. There are many infants deemed at risk but will have larger skin test findings. The results of this study cannot be extrapolated to this population.
Now for the study findings. In my opinion, this is one of the best-designed research studies I have read, both in regards to study design, but also by incorporating solid and proper outcome measures. 640 infants aged 4-11 months old (median age 7.8 months) were divided into two groups: those with negative skin prick tests to peanut and those with mildly positive skin tests to peanut, as defined by a wheal size of 1-4 mm. Ten percent of infants were excluded from the study due to wheal size > 4 mm.
These two cohorts were then randomized to either completely avoid peanut or eat Bamba or peanut butter (the equivalent of 8 peanuts per serving) three times a week until 5 years of age. Every infant randomized to eat peanut then underwent an oral challenge before starting the study to ensure they would not have an allergic reaction. One child with negative skin prick and 6 (13%) children with mildly positive skin prick tests had reactions during challenge and were reassigned to avoidance categories. This is exactly why consultation with a board-certified allergist is paramount before trying this at home – children at risk will need to have skin test and/or oral challenge to ensure safety before incorporating peanut into their diet.
The primary outcome measure was proportion of children who reacted to an oral challenge (gold standard to diagnose food allergy) to peanut at the age of 5. Secondary outcomes included immune markers. Ninety-eight percent of participants remained in the study until completion, which is astounding for a study of this magnitude. There was no significant difference in the rate of serious reactions between the two groups, and only one needed epinephrine. Most reactions were mild to moderate.
Major take home points: An 86% relative risk reduction in peanut allergy between infants with negative skin prick test who regularly consumed peanut compared with those who avoided peanut. Furthermore, there was a 70% reduction in peanut allergy in infants with mildly positive peanut skin prick test (sensitized) who consumed peanut compared with those who avoided.
By the age of five, among the 530 infants who initially had negative skin test results, 13.7% of those who had strictly avoided peanuts developed a peanut allergy, compared to only 1.9% of the children who had been eating peanuts.
Among the 98 infants who had mildly positive skin results, 35.3% of the avoidance group went on to develop a peanut allergy, but only 10.6% of the babies eating peanuts. Impressive, but not 100% effective.
Monitoring adherence to the protocol is crucial for any research conducted largely away from the laboratory. The researchers not only used food diaries, which can be fudged, but also objective measurement of levels of peanut protein in the beds of children in each group. They found significantly more peanut dust from those who were eating peanuts, and estimated 92% adherence for all participants. Furthermore, immune markers were followed over time for all groups. A significant increase in baseline peanut wheal size on skin testing was observed only in the peanut avoidance group. Serum IgE levels increased in both avoidance and consumption groups over time, but there were fewer participants in the consumption group with very high IgE levels at 12, 30 and 60 months. Lastly, levels of peanut-specific IgG and IgG4, the immunoglobulins associated with tolerance, were higher in the consumption group than in the avoidance group. This mirrors the effect seen with standard allergy shots.
So, what does this change? Most importantly, the study demonstrates for the first time that both primary (no sensitization) and secondary (sensitized, not allergic) prevention can occur with early introduction of peanut. There clearly exists a small window of opportunity in which frequent consumption can promote tolerance. It remains to be seen whether this is due to desensitization, i.e. oral immunotherapy, or true prevention, but the authors are already investigating this through their next-phase “LEAP-On” study. For LEAP-On, the participants from LEAP who ate peanut and were not allergic will now stop eating peanut completely and undergo challenge 12 months later. We all can’t wait for those findings!
What does this exciting news mean for the rest of us? I don’t advocate for pediatricians or families to try this without having important information such as skin prick size and oral challenge results, which only allergists can provide. As for working allergists, especially pediatric allergists, they ought to be on the drawing board right now thinking about how to incorporate this new data into their practices. Many families will be discouraged by these thoughts, citing poor access to pediatric allergists. This puts additional responsibility on allergists to find ways of collaborating more closely with pediatricians to enforce higher standards of treatment even as they expand their outreach. Every single study that has enrolled children for food allergy desensitization, treatment, and now prevention has used very specific entry criteria. This method, however low-tech, should be just as conscientious. Even in the research setting, participants still experience allergic reactions. Keep in mind, this study limited participants from those without high risk for development of allergic disease, which we’ve been trying to communicate since 2008. Whenever an experimental therapy is adopted there will always be pressure to step over the line. This study may be called LEAP, but it’s still only one step.
David Stukus, MD, is board certified in Allergy/Immunology and is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. His clinical and research interests focus on asthma and food allergies, especially improving education and adherence for patients and families. As part of his research, Dr. Stukus has created novel technology and educational tools using mobile health apps to improve the care of patients, for which he was recognized with the Nationwide Children’s Hospital Department of Pediatrics Junior Faculty Award in November 2013. Dr. Stukus has been an active member of the medical advisory team for Kids with Food Allergies since 2009 and was elected to the Board of Directors for the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America in 2014. Lastly, Dr. Stukus actively engages with food allergy support groups and participates in social media on twitter through @AllergyKidsDoc. 
- See more at: http://asthmaallergieschildren.com/2015/02/25/breaking-down-the-landmark-leap-study-what-does-it-mean/#sthash.0B0DFhvH.ZidqaGGv.dpuf


Sunday, February 22, 2015

Bay Area Allergy Advisory Board's top picks for Allergy Books for 2013

If you want a great list to get started in your own Food Allergy journey by digging in to a formidable selection of books all related to food allergies, the Bay Area Allergy Advisory Board's choices are a great way to get started.

Included are some great books I can vouch are well worth your time and will offer you many helpful insights into either the life of the allergic individual, such as -- Sloane Miller's Allergic Girl: Adventures in Living Well with Food Allergies.




One particular book gives a great deal if insight and understanding into a complex but intriguing allergy treatment based on a very old form of medicine; Chinese medicine.  Author Henry Ehrlich takes on this story and expertly delves into this complicated, but extremely promising work currently being developed which is as close to becoming as close for food allergies as we've seen to date.  It's  a very interesting insight into the science behind the search for a cure, written by author Henry Ehrlich. Food Allergies: Traditional Chinese Medicine, Western Science, And The Search For A Cure.





















Also on this list is a book by one of the Bay Area Allergy Advisory Board members, Mireille Schwartz, who, interestingly, was featured in the Discovery Channel (wonderful) documentary “An Emerging Epidemic: Food Allergies in America.” 

Her book is  The Family Food Allergy Book.  Unfortunately, I've not read it yet, but absolutely plan to as it seems like it will be both helpful and comprehensive.



Again, if you missed it above, here's a link to the Bay Area Allergy Board's picks, or you can just read below.



Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Inside the Search for Chinese Herbal Food Allergy Treatments


Article reposted courtesy of  ALLERGIC LIVING MAGAZINE.  (subscribe here)


Inside the Search for Chinese Herbal Food Allergy Treatments
Explorers_Dr Ying Song_3
Whenever there is talk of a cure for food allergies, hopes soar. One area of research that has had consistently promising studies in the last few years has been the Food Allergy Herbal Formula, currently called B-FAHF-2, which is being developed by Dr. Xiu-Min Li at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York.
What we often don’t hear about, however, is the people who toil in the labs, making this research possible. One such person is Dr. Ying Song, a professor of pediatrics at Mount Sinai, an expert in mice and allergy research and a key player on the herbal formula research team.
As we launch our new Allergy Explorers series, which celebrates those working tirelessly to find treatments for food allergies, Claire Gagné talks with Dr. Ying Song about her role in this research, what she’s learned about Chinese herbs, and her findings on the impact of mother’s allergy status.

How did you become involved with Dr. Xiu Min-Li’s research?

Back in China I did my post graduate fellowship in immunology, but at that time I was interested in cancer immunology. I found a lot of papers in PubMed, the database of medical research literature, from Dr. Xiu-Min Li [2]’s group at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. They were working on herbal medicine in the immunology field, which grabbed my attention. I e-mailed her wanting to talk about it and she said, “Why don’t you join us to do immunology research here?” I came to North America eight years ago.

What has your role been in the herbal medicine research?

The Chinese herbal formula (FAHF-2) for food allergies has been studied for more than 10 years at Mount Sinai by our group, but there are still a lot of questions we need to answer. For example, how the complex interactions produce synergistic effects, and how to reduce the large numbers of pills it requires taking a day.
A big part of my job is to understand how the traditional Chinese medicine formula (FAHF-2) prevents allergic reaction. My major finding was to identify three pure compounds that promise to benefit millions of allergy patients as anti-allergy therapeutics or as add-ons to other immunotherapy regimens.
We sensitize normal mice with peanut and then test different combination of herbs or active compounds isolated from the herbs on our mouse model to see short-term and also long-term effects – are they safe, can they reduce IgE antibodies, can they help to reduce anaphylactic reactions when we give the mice a huge amount of peanut? If we see a good trend or possible effect, then we will also work on figuring out why. We’re also testing the Chinese herbal formula in combination with other treatments, such as oral immunotherapy [2].

What have you found out about why the herbs work?

We found that some compounds in herb extracts reduce IgE levels, some reduce inflammation, and some block mast cell and basophil histamine release. The bioactive compounds in FAHF-2, which contains extracts of several herbs, have all these effects.
We have learned that these effects are associated with changes in the immune system that represent a more normal (or non-allergic) status. We are now finding alterations in the molecular biology of immune system cells.

How receptive to Chinese herbal medicine do you find people in North America are?

It may not be mainstream here, but people are increasingly interested in and receptive to Chinese herbal medicine. I expect that as research demonstrates the effectiveness of certain herb extracts, and eventually pure herb compounds, that it will become more mainstream.
Next: From mice to humans, and preventing food allergy

SONG Y[3]What else are you working on?

My big interest is how maternal peanut allergy status affects a child’s immune system in regards to the development of peanut allergy.
Clinical observational studies have shown that a mother having allergies increases the chance of a child developing peanut allergies, although the exact reason for this is unknown. We did four years of research in mice on this subject. We made a mouse allergic to peanut and then examined the effects on allergy in the next generation.
We found that something called “DNA methylation”, which is altered when the mouse has a peanut allergy, was already altered in the offspring when they were born. This can go on to cause allergic disease. We will need to verify this finding in humans.

What are the next steps in that research?

This ability to influence DNA methylation status provides an opportunity to reverse the allergy process. If we could somehow correct the epigenetic alteration in the first generation of allergy so this high risk of allergy can not be transferred to the second generation, then we may be able to stop the allergy from developing in the first place. This is my big hope.

What is your lab like?

We take up about a third of the space in a really big lab shared with Dr. Hugh Sampson. You can see at least six fellows and a number of students working in our area at a given time. We have lab meetings every week with Dr. Li. We also have our pediatric allergy division lab meetings under the direction of Dr. Sampson and Dr. Scott Sicherer [4]. That’s where we present our research findings and people can discuss and make suggestions and comments. It’s a very supportive scientific environment.

Are you involved in research on human patients?

Yes, I am involved in human studies in several ways. One is related to FAHF-2 clinical trials. I am in charge of immunological studies that determine how cells respond to the herbal treatment. My second role is to study FAHF-2 and other Chinese herbal medicine extracts and compounds immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory effects on cultured cells from allergic patients and patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Some of Dr. Li’s patients also give blood samples for the in vitro studies. We test cytokine and IgE production, basophil activation, and epigenetic changes, etc. I also work with medical students to organize case reporting from Dr. Li’s off-site clinic, which is where several potential beneficial effects of TCM therapy for food-allergic children have been observed. For example, prevention of frequent and potentially severe reactions, reduced IgE production.
This case study has just been published. I am working on more case reports from Dr. Li off-site clinic on other observed beneficial effects.  Now, I’m looking forward to playing a major role in an upcoming biomarker study of TCM effects on polyallergen sensitization.

What are the next steps for studying traditional Chinese medicine in human patients?

We are proposing a new practice-based study. This study combines clinical practice and basic science to conduct a biomarker study of practice based TCM effects in polyallergen sensitization. The project has raised great interest among families whose children are patients from Dr. Li’s offsite clinic. They have begun fundraising [5], working with Mount Sinai Development Office, for this project. Our first target is $50,000. Once we reach the target, we’re going to start this new study where we can explore the immunological changes with the herbal treatment and how the people with severe food allergy respond to the herbal treatment.

What are some of the challenges you have with your research?

Funding, actually. NIH funding has been very difficult. Fortunately, we received substantial funds from private organizations and philanthropic support. We’re trying really hard to get more private funding and grants, including NIH grants, to continue our research.




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Article printed from Allergic Living: http://allergicliving.com
URL to article: http://allergicliving.com/2015/02/18/inside-search-for-chinese-herbal-allergy-treatment/
URLs in this post:
[1] Image: http://allergicliving.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Explorers_Dr-Ying-Song_3.png
[2] Dr. Xiu-Min Li: http://allergicliving.com/2014/03/18/herbs-and-oit-prove-an-effective-food-allergy-combo/
[3] Image: http://allergicliving.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/SONG-Y.png
[4] Dr. Scott Sicherer: http://allergicliving.com/2015/02/02/food-challenges-when-outgrowing-milk-and-egg-allergies/
[5] fundraising: https://www.crowdrise.com/chinesemedicineforfa/fundraiser/tcmforfoodallergies

Saturday, February 14, 2015

More U.S. Children Have Food Allergies


Is Better Treatment Possible for Children With Food Allergies?

This is a great "share" to send any of your parents, school teachers, care givers, concerned friends: Anyone who has an interest in your peanut allergic child, but may be confused by recent headlines which always make it sound like they've discovered a new "Silver Bullet" to easily "fix" food allergies. We know it's not that simple. This article is an easy read and puts things into a hopeful, encouraging, but realistic perspective. It's a great starting point for parents new to this world of food allergies

Is Better Treatment Possible for Children With Food Allergies?

-- From HuffPo + Mount Sinai Health System



JUNK FOOD BAN ONTARIO
Hugh Sampson, M.D.
Director, Jaffe Food Allergy Institute
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Your child, who is allergic to peanuts and tree nuts, just received a coveted invitation to a big birthday bash. She is excited... but you're terrified. What foods will they serve at the party? Will they use the same ice cream scoop for the butter pecan as the vanilla? Will they offer candy containing a trace amount of peanuts? 
More and more American parents today are living with the fear that their food-allergic child will accidentally ingest a problematic food and trigger a life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence of food allergies increased approximately 50 percent between 1997 and 2011 among U.S. children aged 17 and younger. Currently, there is no way to predict one's risk for severe allergic reactions, and the only approved treatment methods for food allergies are avoidance, and administration of the drug epinephrine to stop a reaction should one occur. 
At the Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, we are working to change that through research focused on developing more accurate diagnostic methods and better treatments, as well as preventions for food allergies. It is an exciting and promising time for food allergy research. Below is a glimpse of just some of our research aimed at improving treatment strategies: 
Baked Egg and Milk Studies
The standard practice for managing egg and milk allergies has been to pull all forms of these foods from a child's diet. Recent studies have shifted our thinking about this treatment approach. Our research on milk and egg allergies previously showed that the majority of children with these allergies could tolerate products containing baked eggs and milk, such as muffins and cookies, because of the way heat changes the allergenic proteins. We also found that including baked milk or eggs in the diet speeds up the development of tolerance to regular egg or milk, compared to strict avoidance. We are now further studying the mechanisms responsible for these results, with the hope that our answers could dramatically change children's diet restrictions, while shortening the duration of their allergies to regular milk and egg.
Oral Immunotherapy
Our own research has shown that the prevalence of peanut allergy alone tripled among children between 1997 and 2008, with more than 1 million kids now affected. While children often outgrow allergies to some foods, such as egg, milk, wheat, and soy, allergies to peanuts and tree nuts usually persist. We are currently studying whether providing young peanut-allergic children with an experimental treatment of oral immunotherapy (OIT) will eventually eliminate their peanut allergy. 
In OIT, we give a tiny amount of peanut flour periodically and then slowly increase the amount to determine the maintenance dose needed to desensitize the child to peanuts. It's similar to what we do with allergy shots for pollen allergies, except this is a very small amount of the allergen given by mouth. OIT does seem to provide good protection for accidental ingestion of peanuts, but the downsides include a significant number of adverse reactions that occur before the maintenance dose is found, and the requirement for therapy to continue long-term to remain effective.
Sublingual Immunotherapy
We are also looking at sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). This is where we give children a small amount of peanut extract to hold in their mouth. The cells of the mouth take up some of the peanut protein, causing some desensitization to occur. Our findings so far are consistent with what other researchers have seen, in that SLIT does afford some protection for food allergies, but not to the degree that we're seeing in OIT. The big benefit is a significantly lower amount of adverse reactions. We are currently focusing on how to make this therapy more effective at providing a higher level of protection on par with OIT.
Epicutaneous Therapy 
Another method we're researching is epicutaneous therapy to see if an experimental skin patch reduces allergic reactions to peanuts in children. In this study, for which I am the primary investigator, the child wears a small skin patch, similar to a little circular Band-Aid, which has a small amount of peanut protein in the center. Older children wear the patch on the inside of their arm, while younger children wear it on their back, and the patch is changed daily. 
A very small amount of the peanut protein permeates the outer layer of skin, where special immune cells ingest it and make their way to local lymph nodes. Here, they activate a type of regulatory immune cell, which dampens the immune system's response to the peanut protein. In our research, we have seen virtually no systemic reactions in the children participating in this clinical trial, and we hope this therapy will prove to be a more permanent way to turn off an allergic reaction.
Chinese Herbal Therapy
Finally, we are about to start a human clinical trial of an herbal product designed for use as an investigational drug for children with multiple food allergies, a condition that can be particularly challenging when it comes to dietary restrictions. In preclinical studies, this herbal formula, which is derived from ingredients used in traditional Chinese medicine, proved extremely effective in turning off the allergic response in a mouse model of peanut allergy. 
Research conducted over the past few years, and now underway at our institution and others around the country, has generated promising developments in diagnosing and treating food allergies. I am optimistic that in a not-too-distant future, parents will be able to send their food-allergic child off to that party, with the confidence that he or she will return home safe and sound

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Sara Lee, Thomas' bagels recalled in Midwest due to risk of peanut, almond allergy

Sara Lee, Thomas' bagels recalled in Midwest due to risk of peanut, almond allergy By Brie Zeltner, The Plain Dealer 


Bimbo Bakeries of Horsham, Pennsylvania is recalling some varieties of its Thomas', Sara Lee and Jewel brand bagels in Midwestern states because they may contain peanuts or almonds, posing a risk to people with allergies. The items have already been pulled from shelves, and customers can return any they have purchased for a full refund. (AP Photo/Gary Kazanjian)
CLEVELAND, Ohio-- Bimbo Bakeries is recalling three brands of its bagels distributed in the Midwest because they may contain peanuts and almonds which are not declared on the labels, posing a risk to consumers who are allergic to the nuts, according to a news release.
The recall began after the bakery, based in Horsham, Pennsylvania, discovered peanuts and almonds in one of the ingredients used in Thomas', Sara Lee and Jewel bagels. No illnesses have yet been reported, according to the company.
To see a list of the recalled products, check here. The bagels were distributed in Ohio, Iowa, Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.
Peanut allergy is one of the most common food allergies among children-- in a 2010 phone survey, 2.1 percent of respondents reported having a child with an allergy to peanuts, tree nuts or both. Peanuts are also the food allergen most commonly associated with a fatal allergic reaction called anaphylaxis, which can send the body into shock, according to the American College of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology.
About 25 to 40 percent of people who are allergic to peanuts (which are a legume) are also allergic to tree nuts, which include almond, cashews and walnuts, though some people are allergic to one and not the other. Symptoms of tree nut allergy include itchy mouth, throat, difficulty swallowing, runny nose, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea and potentially shortness of breath and life-threatening anaphylaxis.
To make it easier for consumers with food allergies to protect themselves, the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 requires that food labels declare the presence of any "major food allergen," defined as milk, eggs, fish (e.g., bass, flounder, cod), Crustacean shellfish (e.g., crab, lobster, shrimp), tree nuts (e.g., almonds, walnuts, pecans), peanuts, wheat, and soybeans.
If you've bought the recalled bagels, you can return them to the place you purchased them for a full refund. If you have questions for the company, call 1-800-984-0989 at any time.
You can also find more information about food safety from the FDA here, or by calling 1-888-SAFEFOOD Monday through Friday between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. eastern time.
© 2015 cleveland.com. All rights reserved.

Whole Foods Market Recalls Items Prepared With Supplier-provided Ground Cumin Spice Due To Possible Health Risk (FULL LIST HERE)

Whole Foods Market Recalls Items Prepared With Supplier-provided Ground Cumin Spice Due To Possible Health Risk

Recalled items sold in CT, KY MA, MD, ME, NJ, NY, NH, OH, PA, RI, VA, Washington, D.C. Whole Foods Market Stores
Contact:
Consumer:
512-477-5566

Media:
Michael Silverman
Michael.Silverman@wholefoods.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE — February 9, 2015 — Austin, TX — Whole Foods Market has recalled items prepared with a supplier’s ground cumin spice ingredient that may have contained undeclared peanut. People with an allergy or severe sensitivity to peanuts run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.
No allergic reactions have been reported to-date, and recalled items have been pulled from store shelves. Whole Foods Market was notified by its supplier that undeclared peanut protein was found in cumin supplied to some of its facilities.
Items that contained ground cumin spice subject to the recall were sold from January 14, 2015 through February 6, 2015. Not all items or all products were sold in all store locations. Affected items such as prepared salads, seasoned meat items, tacos, and other seasoned items were sold in Whole Foods Market stores in CT, KY, MA, MD, ME, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, VA, and Washington, D.C. Additionally, Whole Foods Market pulled and destroyed the recalled ground cumin spice and all items containing this recalled ingredient in all regions where it was available.
The following is a list of recalled items:
UPC or PLU CodeProduct DescriptionSell By DateRegionStates
0-00000-68899SLAW KALE AVOCADO HSH 14 OZBest By: 2/9/2015North AtlanticCT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-31090-00000TOFU GRILLED LIME CHIPOTLEBest By: 2/9/2015North AtlanticCT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-53184-00000Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast BBQ

Best By: 2/9/2015North AtlanticCT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-58426-00000Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast LIME CHIPOTLEBest By: 2/9/2015
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-65293-00000BURRITO CHIPOTLE LIME TOFUBest By: 2/7/2015North AtlanticCT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-65294-00000TACO SALAD TOFU CHIPOTLE LIME

Best By: 2/7/2015North AtlanticCT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-65960-00000BURRITO PORK CARNITAS

Best By: 2/9/2015North AtlanticCT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-67612-00000CHICKEN SKEWER LIME CHIPOTLEBest By: 2/9/2015North AtlanticCT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-83938-00000BURRITO CHPTLE LIME TOFU TACOSBest By: 2/7/2015North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-86949-00000QUESADILLA CARNITASBest By: 2/9/2015North AtlanticCT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-91204-00000Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast LIME CHIPOTLE
Best By: 2/9/2015
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53072Tex Mex Beef MeatloafAll Sell by dates through 2/9/15North AtlanticCT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53094CHICKEN BREAST SPLIT BBQAll Sell by dates through 2/18/15North AtlanticCT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53184BBQ Rubed bnls breast

All Sell by dates through 2/18/15

North AtlanticCT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53238

CHICKEN SATAY LIME CHIPOLTE

All Sell by dates through 2/9/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53241
CHICKEN KABOB LIME CHIPOTLE
All Sell by dates through 2/9/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53275
CHICKEN LEG BBQ
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
58705
CHICKEN WHOLE LATIN SPICED
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-65293-00000
BURRITO CHIPOTLE LIME TOFU
Best By: 2/7/2015
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-65294-00000
TACO SALAD TOFU CHIPOTLE LIME
Best By: 2/7/2015
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-65960-00000
BURRITO PORK CARNITAS
Best By: 2/9/2015
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-67612-00000
CHICKEN SKEWER LIME CHIPOTLE
Best By: 2/9/2015
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-83938-00000
BURRITO CHPTLE LIME TOFU TACOS
Best By: 2/7/2015
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-86949-00000
QUESADILLA CARNITAS
Best By: 2/9/2015
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
2-91204-00000
Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast LIME CHIPOTLE
Best By: 2/9/2015
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53072
Tex Mex Beef Meatloaf
All Sell by dates through 2/9/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53094
CHICKEN BREAST SPLIT BBQ
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53184
BBQ Rubed bnls breast
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53238
CHICKEN SATAY LIME CHIPOLTE
All Sell by dates through 2/9/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53241
CHICKEN KABOB LIME CHIPOTLE
All Sell by dates through 2/9/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
53275
CHICKEN LEG BBQ
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
58705
CHICKEN WHOLE LATIN SPICED
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
58877
TURKEY BREAST LATIN SPICED
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
90942
CHICKEN DRUMSTICKS BBQ
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
90950
CHICKEN KABOB BBQ
All Sell by dates through 2/9/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI

91174
BEEF SIRLOIN KABOBS BBQ
All Sell by dates through 2/9/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
91204
CHICKEN BREAST BONELESS LIME CHIPOTLE
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
91283
CHICKEN THIGH BBQ
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
91382
CHICKEN WHOLE BBQ
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
91412
PORK RIBS BABY BACK BBQ
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
91785
PORK SPARERIB BONE IN BBQ
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
91817
CHICKEN KABOB HSH CUMIN BALSAMIC
All Sell by dates through 2/9/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
94640
BEEF KABOB HSH CUMIN BALSAMIC
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
95999
CHICKEN WHOLE ROTISSERIE BBQ
All Sell by dates through 2/18/15
North Atlantic
CT, MA,ME,NH,RI
3640630278
WFM DIP GUACAMOLE PPK
All Sell by dates through 2/10/15
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
3640630306
WFM SALSA FRESCA PPK
All Sell by dates through 2/10/15
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
3640630279
WFM DIP SALSA PICO DE GALLO PPK
All Sell by dates through 2/10/15
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
3640630256
WFM MEAL ENCHILADA AND DIRTY RICE EV
All Sell by dates through 2/10/15
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
3640630432
WFM  SNACK PACK MEZZE HSH
All Sell by dates through 2/10/15
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI

3640630394
WFM CHILI FIREHOUSE PPK HSH
All Sell by dates through 2/10/15
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
3640630126
WFM CHILI TURKEY AND BLACK BEAN PPK
All Sell by dates through 2/10/15
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
3640630127
WFM CHILI BEEF BRAISED LOCAL PPK
All Sell by dates through 2/10/15
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
26270400000
BURRITO BLACK BEAN AND CHEESE
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
26524200000
BURRITO CHICKEN CHILI VERDE
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
27013500000
GUACAMOLE BULK CC
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
26405800000
QUESADILLA MUSHROOM GOAT CHEESE
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
26404400000
QUESADILLA VEGGIE
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
26206400000
SALSA FRESCA BULK CC
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
26270400000
BURRITO BLACK BEAN AND CHEESE
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
26278700000
BURRITO PORK CARNITAS
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
26978700000
ENCHILADA ADOBO BULK
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
26815600000
QUESADILLA CHICKEN
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
26193100000
RED BEANS AND RICE
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
26890500000
SALSA PICO DE GALLO BULK
Sold from food bars thru 2/5
North Atlantic & North East
CT, MA,ME,NH,NJ,NY,RI
58613
CHICKEN SATAY LIME CHIPOLTE
Best by 2/9/15
North East
CT,NJ,NY
58774
CHICKEN YAKITORI LIME CHIPOTLE
Best by 2/9/15
North East
CT,NJ,NY
91204
CHICKEN BREAST BONELESS LIME CHIPOTLE
Best by 2/9/15
North East
CT,NJ,NY
58779
LIME CHIPOTLE MARINATED BUTTERFLIED CORNISH HEN
Best by 2/9/15
North East
CT,NJ,NY
91785
PORK SPARERIB BONE IN BBQ
Best by 2/9/15
North East
CT,NJ,NY
91382
CHICKEN WHOLE BBQ
Best by 2/9/15
North East
CT,NJ,NY
53127
BEEF RIBS BBQ
Best by 2/9/15
North East
CT,NJ,NY
53094
CHICKEN BREAST SPLIT BBQ
Best by 2/9/15
North East
CT,NJ,NY
91283
CHICKEN THIGH BBQ
Best by 2/9/15
North East
CT,NJ,NY
90942
CHICKEN DRUMSTICK BBQ
Best by 2/9/15
North East
CT,NJ,NY
91406
CHICKEN WINGS BBQ
Best by 2/9/15
North East
CT,NJ,NY
27312900000
Chicken Burrito Bowl HSH
Best By: 2/9/2015
North East
CT,NJ,NY
26708000000
Chicken Quesadilla Salad CC
Best By:2/8/2015
North East
CT,NJ,NY
26717100000
Chicken Quesadilla Salad FP
Best By:2/8/2015
North East
CT,NJ,NY
26008800000
Southwest Chicken Wrap HSH
Best By: 2/8/2015
North East
CT,NJ,NY
28634600000
Southwest Stuffed Sweets HSH CC
Best By: 2/10/2015
North East
CT,NJ,NY
26066400000
Southwest Stuffed Sweets HSH FP
Best By: 2/10/2015
North East
CT,NJ,NY
26888900000
Southwest Turkey Wrap FP
Best By: 2/8/2015
North East
CT,NJ,NY
26831100000
Ceviche, Mushroom
Best By: 2/6/2015
North East
CT,NJ,NY

26157400000
Burger, Lentil Dal
Use by 1/20/15-2/7/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
00000480430
Burrito, Black Bean
Use by 2/8/15 - 2/11/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
00000480432
Burrito, Shrimp
Use by 2/8/15 - 2/11/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
00000480428
Chili, Beef Blazin
Use by 3/6/15-3/11/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
00000484003
Dip, Black Bean
Use by 1/20/15-2/7/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
00000480504
Dip, Mexican Layer Large
Use by 1/20/15-2/7/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
00000480505
Dip, Mexican Layer Small
Use by 1/20/15-2/7/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
26735600000
Enchilada, Adobo Black Bean
Use by 2/8/15 - 2/11/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
48000088750
HotBar, NE Tofu Meatloaf
Use by 1/20/15-1/25/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
48000088650
HotBar, Latin Comfort, Beef Barbacoa
Use by  2/8/15 - 2/9/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
48000088655
HotBar, Latin Comfort, Stewed  Black Beans
Use by 2/27/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
28526300000
Meatloaf, Tofu
Use by 1/20/15-2/7/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
26187200000
Quesadilla, Black Bean
Use by 2/8/15 - 2/11/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
27267700000
Quesadilla, Vegan Beef
Use by 1/20/15-2/7/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA

00000480502
Salad, Bowl, Mediterranean
Use by 1/20/15-2/7/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
48000086479
Salad, Papas con Remolachas
Use by 1/20/15-2/1/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
48000011103
Sauce, Adobo
Use by 7/25/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
48000025248
Vegetarian, NEW Falafel
Use by 1/20/15-2/7/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
00000480435
Soup, Butternut Collard Posole Cups
Use by 3/4/15-3/22/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
00000480508
Soup, Moroccan Green Lentil Cups
Use by 3/4/15-3/22/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
26187100000 
Quesadilla Adobo Black Bean 
Use by 2/8-2/11/15 
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
48000088656
Mexican Lasagna
Use by 2/8/15-2/12/15
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
61584
Chipotle Marinated London Broil
Use by 2/10/2015
Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
67544
Adobo Chicken
Use by 2/8/2015

Mid Atlantic
DC,KY,MD,NJ,OH,PA,VA
Whole Foods Market was notified by a spice supplier that it was recalling its ground cumin spice due to a positive test for peanut allergens.
Signage is posted in Whole Foods Market stores to notify customers of this recall. Customers who have purchased recalled product from Whole Foods Market should discard it, and may bring in their receipt for a full refund. Consumers with questions may call 512-477-5566, extension 20060, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Central Daylight Time.